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J.T. Barrett put on a masterful display against Rutgers

The signal caller put on a quarterback clinic vs. Ohio State's former defensive coordinator.

Rutgers v Ohio State Photo by Jamie Sabau/Getty Images

J.T. Barrett has mastered Urban Meyer’s offensive scheme, and it’s a beautiful thing to watch.

It’s been reiterated in three of the four games, but this offense is truly unstoppable when the play calling has been diverse. They got the running game rolling early, which then set up play-action and the passing game. Barrett’s comfort and confidence has grown every week, which should get him an invite to New York City.

Let’s see how it went:

J.T. Barrett

Designed runs Dropbacks Completions Incompletions Total TD Scrambles Overthrows Throwaways
3 31 20 8 4 2 1 1
Pressured Sacked Hit Pass break-up Batted at LOS Drops Turnovers Defensive PI
4 0 2 2 0 2 1 0
  • *Tap passes do not count as a pass attempt
  • Barrett was so efficient on Saturday afternoon. Out of his 31 dropbacks, he completed 20 of those, and most were in the intermediate part of the field.
  • What has made life easier for Barrett, has been his offensive line. He was only pressured four times on the day, which led to only two quarterback hits. The clean pocket has allowed Barrett to remain comfortable within the pocket and keep his eyes downfield at all times.
  • The three designed quarterback runs has to be the lowest amount that he has had in a game in his career. This was mostly due to his ability to make the smart decision in the option game, and just taking what the Rutgers’ defense gave him.
  • Here is a classic Barrett keeper on an inside zone read, on 4th-and-1. His patience to hold the ball at the mesh point, — basically waiting for Mike Weber to be tackled — pulling the ball and gaining the necessary yardage is textbook J.T. Barrett.
  • The most important revelation in this blowout though, came in the final 1:34 of the first half, where Barrett orchestrated a nine-play, 53-yard drive, that resulted in a Curtis Samuel touchdown reception.
  • The key play of the drive occurred on 3rd-and-25, when Barrett hit Samuel for a 24-yard gain, setting up a 4th-and-1. The aggressive playcalling put the offense in a chance to succeed because typically any offense would kneel on the ball and go into halftime when facing a 3rd-and-25.
  • On this throw, Barrett felt the rush, stepped up in the pocket — kept his eyes downfield — and threw a 24-yard dart to Samuel. This is one of the best passing plays from start-to-finish, that Barrett has made in his career.
  • Barrett and Joe Burrow hit 12 different players for completions on Saturday, which shows the confidence that both quarterbacks have in their teammates. These guys are all highly touted and team-first guys. They seem to be about the offense putting points on the board in any way possible, rather than padding stats.

Mike Weber’s 46-yard touchdown run

In my breakdown last week, I mentioned that Weber was inches away from breaking the big one. Against Rutgers, he was caught from behind on one long run, but then made up for it by taking an outside zone read play and taking it to the house. Weber’s first long touchdown of the seas was a result of Barrett, Weber, Billy Price, Marcus Baugh and James Clark all executing on the play.

Barrett did a great job of using his patience to hold the defense end, while Baugh was able to kick out a defender and Price was able to pull around and cut the linebacker. Clark did a nice job on the cornerback, which effectively sprung the running back.

Weber possesses the power to gain the tough yardage, but he also has some quickness and acceleration, which has helped him gain 10-plus yards 15 times, and 20-plus yards, four times. He’s not going to hit the homerun once a game — like Ezekiel Elliott — but he’s consistent and will batter a defense. When the zone read is ran to perfection like this, it’s almost unstoppable.

The scary thing is, is that it’s only the fourth game of the season, and they’ll only get better as the season progresses.