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Ohio State President Michael Drake is against paying student-athletes

The University President supports the current system.

NCAA Basketball: Michigan at Ohio State Greg Bartram-USA TODAY Sports

“I understand the pressures on student athletes and understand the nature and the size of our athletic enterprise. But I think the student-athlete relationship has served our students and our country well for decades.”

-Ohio State University President Michael V. Drake, via the Columbus Dispatch

For years, people connected — and not connected — to college athletics have widely debated whether or not student athletes should be paid salaries on top of the scholarship funding they already receive. It’s not a conversation that will likely end anytime soon, but Ohio State’s President Drake recently served on a panel at the Economic Club of Washington, D.C. and spoke about his position against paying athletes following the discussion.

The President spoke about the success of the current student-athlete system which provides help with tuition costs, along with room and board. He even cited his own father being a student-athlete years ago and admitted his father probably “wouldn’t have gone to college otherwise”.

In 2015, Ohio State along with other major universities, agreed to pay a cost of attendance stipend (averaging $3,000) in addition to their scholarship funding. Despite the flexibility to provide additional compensation to student-athletes, the College Athletes Players Association continue to argue the stipend isn’t enough.

Samuel matched that big talk with a relentless work ethic and focus to match. He latched on to the family and coaches who shared his vision and insulated him from the issues that could derail his rise.”

-Joseph Staszewski and Zach Braziller, New York Post

Curtis Samuel is one of the few Buckeyes and college football players out of Brooklyn to find enough success to be considered a top prospect for the NFL. His work ethic and dedication to the game is what opened up these opportunities, but it was the support of his family and coaches that kept him on the right path.

Samuel’s high school coach at Erasmus Hall, Danny Landberg, is the one that encouraged the running back/receiver hybrid to focus on the academic aspects of his high school career as much as his on-field work. The Buckeye quickly became dedicated to his studies, with Landberg even framing a copy of Samuel’s transcript to inspire the next generation of Brooklyn ballers.

When Samuel finally hears his name called during the 2017 NFL Draft, it will mark the first time a skill player from New York City is selected in the first few rounds since 1986 when the Bills drafted Ronnie Harmon at No. 16.

“I always told Malik, 6-2, 200 pounds, that’s minus-minus in the NBA. I said as a defensive back in Division I football or the NFL, that’s plus-plus because of how long he was and how athletic he was.”

-Head Coach Joe Cowart, to Chad Krispinsky of WYTV

Interception-magnet Malik Hooker didn’t make his way to the football field until his junior year of high school. Thanks to Coach Cowart, who convinced the Buckeye that his future wasn’t as an NBA star, but rather an NFL player.

It only took one season on the grid iron to draw interest from top college programs like Ohio State, and just like that he was on his way. He spent three seasons in Columbus, where he went from first-year starter to possible first-round draft pick.

The basketball background only helps Hooker compete with those who have played football their whole lives. His fast and fancy footwork can be attributed to his days on the court, and with so few years of experience under his belt, he still has loads of potential.

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